Komandorski Islands. (Postcard, 1981.)

Most Soviet tourists flocked to the typical holiday destinations like Crimea and Caucasus. The state, anyhow, wanted to boost also other places, if not actually for tourism, then to advertise the grandeur of the Soviet Union. For this reason even some extremely remote places ended up in tourist postcards. Here is a postcard from 1980s showing a village in Komandorski Islands. The island group is situated in the middle of Bering sea, almost 200 kilometres from the mainland and the Kamchatka peninsula. They are treeless and rocky islets, basically wasteland, and didn’t probably get any tourism. Still, the Soviet Union printed a series of postcards of the Komandorski Islands, and with quite distinctive style, too.

Welcome to Soviet Moldavia. (Brochure, 1980s.)

If you think Soviet tourism as gray and colourless, think again. At least advertisement was full of excitement. Already in the 1930s some of the notable Intourist posters were very artistic and full of colour, and from 1970s on this became almost standard in the Soviet tourism aesthetics, especially outside of the Soviet Union. Here is the cover of Finnish language Intourist brochure advertising the Moldavian Soviet Socialist Republic. The drawing combines hippie style, cute naivism and garish palette to promote the little-known state, famous for its wine, tranquil country life, and – of course – brutalist white tower block.

In Crimea. (Brochure, 1980s.)

What was dream vacation like in the Soviet Union? During the 1970s and 1980s it meant a trip – preferably a car trip – to Crimea, and few weeks in a “kurort”, as the health spas were called in Russian after German model. In the late Soviet Union holidays were less ideological and more about rest, fun and freedom. Here is a full page illustration from an Intourist brochure promoting private car trips to the Black Sea coast. Apart from the inevitable Lada Zhiguli car, the photo could be from any European travel ad. Of course, in the Soviet Union only marginal part of the common citizens ever had an opportunity to travel to Crimea, let alone with a private car, so for most it remained literally a dream vacation.

Schema of flight routes to the Black Sea towns of the Soviet Union. (Brochure, 1980s.)

It is probable that the graphic artist of Intourist was heavily drunk when he designed this instructive illustration. Approaching the end of the 20th century, Soviet tourism became more and more liberated. Especially foreign travellers could go for relaxing vacation and not get force-fed with socialism and factory tours. Alongside holidays, the aesthetics of tourist brochures was also liberated – sometimes too much. Here is a page from Intourist booklet presenting Black Sea towns to Finnish audience. As the title declares, the image shows the flight routes from important Soviet cities to Yalta, Sukhumi etc. But the graph is so extravagant, that it doesn’t really give any information about the routes. This reveals the true intention behind the illustration: it wanted to tell the reader how modern and advanced the Soviet Union is with dozens of flight routes and millions of holiday-makers.

Camping site Butovo. (Brochure, 1980s.)

Camping was a popular hobby in the Soviet Union. Early on, in 1930s, it meant mostly overnight hiking trips outside the buzzing industrial cities, but later, during the 1980s, trips got longer and reached further away. At that point some citizens already sported private cars, for example Lada or Mosckvich, and in there one could fit the family, a tent, and the necessary gear for a proper camping trip. Unfortunately, even roadtrippers were not free to go anywhere. The roads permitted to vacationers were clearly marked on the map, and the nights had to be spent in official camping sites, like the one here at Butovo, just outside Moscow.