Crimea. (Brochure, 1970s.)

Crimea was THE destination of Soviet tourism from 1920s, when bolsheviks belonging to the nomenclature had their dachas there, right into the 1980s, when Soviet mass tourism was at its peak. Moreover, Crimea was, and still is, symbolically important, as the latest events in the area have shown. Soviet Union marketed Crimea also to foreign tourists, and there were some hotels that were open only to western holidaymakers. Here is a brochure printed in Finland in 1970s, advertising Crimea and the Caucasus as a destination. All the vacation cliches are there: deep blue sea, golden sand, nature and tranquility. Even freedom is hinted, as travelling is done by a private car. In the late Soviet era, tourism in Crimea had many features in common with the western tourism of the same era.

In Crimea. (Brochure, 1980s.)

What was dream vacation like in the Soviet Union? During the 1970s and 1980s it meant a trip – preferably a car trip – to Crimea, and few weeks in a “kurort”, as the health spas were called in Russian after German model. In the late Soviet Union holidays were less ideological and more about rest, fun and freedom. Here is a full page illustration from an Intourist brochure promoting private car trips to the Black Sea coast. Apart from the inevitable Lada Zhiguli car, the photo could be from any European travel ad. Of course, in the Soviet Union only marginal part of the common citizens ever had an opportunity to travel to Crimea, let alone with a private car, so for most it remained literally a dream vacation.